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British model Iskra Lawrence is a beautiful creature, and her flawless photos have appeared in all sorts of major campaigns including American Eagle’s lingerie brand Aerie.

And while Lawrence looks like the epitome of perfection, the model wants us to know that she has fleshy bits of skin and fat just like the rest of us. She loves her rolls, and wants us to embrace our bodies for what they are, too. She’s not just a drop-dead beauty, but a positive role model for women of all ages.

“If I have some rolls showing or whatever, I’m not scared to post that,” Lawrence says in the video below.


“I’m not scared to sit here in my underwear and make this video for you guys, because this is my body. You know, it really doesn’t matter. I just wish we saw more of it.”

According to Lawrence, these perfect model poses that we see in the media come down to angles. How Lawrence sits–straight up, making her tummy as flat as possible–and how she moves her torso gives a more toned version of herself. But the reality is, her rolls are still there! It’s a part of being a human with skin.

“Because of poses and editing we are lead to believe it’s not as attractive to have rolls, but I want to demonstrate with the power of posing just how easy it is to have a flat tummy one minute and rolls the next,” she states. “And guess what: either way is beautiful because our bodies are freaking amazing.”

Your fat rolls are beautiful🙌 ⬆️I made a video about them (link in my bio)⬆️ And the reason we have been lead to believe they aren’t is because we don’t see them in the media unless someone’s being shamed for weight gain or ridiculed for their body. This is NOT the truth and not OK. Having rolls of skin / fat that are soft / squidgy or big / small does not define your beauty. I wanted to show you how my body looks when I’m relaxed and when I’m posing right next to each other so you can see how easy it is to manipulate how a body looks. (I filmed myself doing this for you on my YouTube) As a model in the industry 13years I’ve seen nearly all the pics chosen of me for lingerie & swimwear shoots are the ones where my stomach looks flattest. Which for a long time lead me to believe that’s how I should look. Because even if I did happen to have a few shots where I’m in a position you can see back fat or rolls someone had decided it’s more “beautiful” “aspirational” or will inspire more customers to buy the product if those so called “flaws” don’t exist.  But things are changing I remember the first time I saw curvier models in editorials with their rolls and back fat and I remember the first time I shot with @aerie and they wanted me to not pose but be real and just myself. Then when I saw my first campaign with them and I could see my unretouched body – pics with rolls / back fat I’m not gonna lie I was shocked. That quickly turned into joy because they made me feel good enough and knew that those “flaws” didn’t mean I wasn’t beautiful in fact showing that their models didn’t have to be “flawless” was incredibly empowering. So thank you #AerieReal and everyone who created the movement it’s not just game changing but life changing ILY😘  And that’s why when I started my insta about 3years ago I created the #everyBODYisbeautiful bc we are more than the sum of our perfections we are all beautiful equal souls living in imperfectly perfect bodies.

A photo posted by i s k r a (@iskra) on

Lawrence’s voice is just the kind of body positive messaging we need more of. Yes, our eyeballs are inundated with perfect faces, arms, stomachs and legs in magazines, on television and online, countless times a day. But hearing that models’ bodies are purposely positioned to get the most lean look makes us feel a whole lot more comfortable in our own skin, soft fleshy parts and all.

Best of all, Lawrence isn’t alone. More and more young women are openly owning and loving their bodies just as they are. This past weekend, body positive advocate Milly Smith posted a side-by-side photo of the magic of control-top nylons.

Same girl, same day, same time. 💛 Not a before and after. Not a weight loss transformation. Not a diet company promotion. 💛 I am comfortable with my body in both. Neither is more or less worthy. Neither makes me more or less of a human being. Neither invites degrading comments and neither invites sleezy words. 💛 We are so blinded to what a real unposed body looks like and blinded to what beauty is that people would find me less attractive within a 5 second pose switch! How insanely ridiculous is that!? 💛 I love taking these, it helps my mind so much with body dysmorphia and helps me rationalise my negative thoughts. 💛 Don’t compare, just live for you. There is no one on this planet who’s like you and that’s pretty damn amazing don’t ya think. The world doesn’t need another copy, it needs you. 💛 We are worthy, valid and powerful beyond measure 💙🌟 (If you don’t pull your tights up as high as possible are you really human?)

A photo posted by Milly Smith 💛🌻☀️👑 (@selfloveclubb) on

In one photo, the tights are high up around her waist, and in the second, lower under her belly. “I am comfortable with my body in both. Neither is more or less worthy. Neither makes me more or less of a human being,” Smith writes.

Smith and Lawrence share this love of their bodies, an act we think all women should cultivate.