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Being a kid is never easy, but when it comes to the middle child, their issues are so specific that there’s a term for it. ‘Middle child syndrome’ is the common occurrence of the middle child feeling left out of the family dynamic. While the oldest child often bears the brunt of responsibility and acts as an example for their younger siblings, the youngest child is the baby of the family and often receives the most attention. So what’s left for the middle child? The added pressure to create their own space within the household.

As one mommy blogger recently wrote, parenting a middle child also comes with its own unique challenges.

Claire Tracey is the writer of the blog Mammy Brightside, a place where she shares her feelings and experiences as a mother of three children. Looking after an eight-year-old, a five-year-old, and a three-year-old is a never-ending source of inspiration for the writer, with Tracey’s honest, emotional and often times hilarious articles helping her to gain a following of devoted readers.

Recently, Tracey shared a story on her Facebook page that has since gone viral. Tracey writes that her middle child won a trophy at her tournament for camogie, an Irish sport. In her lengthy post, Tracey says that she feels an immense amount of guilt over missing yet another event in her middle child’s life because she was busy at the ER with another one of her children.

“Child 2 and her happy go lucky, non shit giving little self sometimes gets the least of my attention throughout the day. This of course worries me, I end up staring at her as she sleeps riddled with guilt, taking in every inch of her perfect, happy go lucky, non shit giving little self, promising to be better, for her, I need to be better,” writes Tracey.

Even though Tracey, like many parents, worries she’s not giving her child enough attention, she writes a message to her daughter, saying that she sees what an amazing person her daughter is every day. “I see you share every single thing you own without question, I see you always thinking of your brother and sister, no matter what you get you always make sure you’re not empty handed for them coming home, I see you sometimes get anxious before school or in crowds, I see you breathing with me and taking me in, I see you watch me wipe your tears, I see you then bravely walking in. I see you worry when your sister once again slams her door, I see you negotiate with your brother when he’s mid shit losing and crying and kicking on the floor, I see you dance and sing… you actually have no idea of the joy you bring.”

The emotional post has garnered support from other parents suffering from feelings of guilt, with many agreeing that the ‘easiest’ child who doesn’t demand attention often receives the least attention.

Check out Tracey’s full post below.