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It seems like everywhere we turn, we’re faced with a new, old or updated story about a man preying on those under him, wielding his power in an effort to harass, abuse or assault another. And while it may be getting tougher and tougher to digest, there is no question, the subject — no matter how uncomfortable — absolutely needs to be talked about, constantly and consistently, for there to be any hope for change.

As more and more accusers come out against men in power positions — Donald Trump, Harvey Weinstein, Kevin Spacey, Brett Ratner, Russell Simmons, Dustin Hoffman, Bryan Singer, Mario Batali, just to name a gross few — filmmaker Morgan Spurlock has come out in an open letter, admitting to sexual harassment, rampant infidelity and detailing a “one night stand” that resulted in a rape accusation.

“As I sit around watching hero after hero, man after man, fall at the realization of their past indiscretions, I don’t sit by and wonder “who will be next?” I wonder, “when will they come for me?”

This. How many men are freaking out, wondering when their time will come? Wondering who’s going to accuse them of some gross misconduct they thought they were totally justified in doing? How many rapists, predators and harassers are out there — be it in the entertainment industry, politics, or in an office or restaurant or any place of work in which someone is considered a higher-up — waiting for their name to be uttered by a person they hurt in some way?

Cynics will chalk Spurlock’s admission up to self-serving crap, and say his motives are simply to beat an accusation or lawsuit to the punch. Others might give him credit for wanting to try to be a “part of the solution,” and for recognizing what he’s done and how he hopes to change. But is that where we are now? Giving credit to abusers for coming clean? For owning up to their wrongdoings?

We suppose there’s no easy answer. It would be good if more men came forward of their own accord but in an ideal world, what would be better is if men would just stop doing this sh*t.

As for Spurlock, the details of his “one night stand” were chilling yet familiar–because how many men have thought it was OK to keep going, even though a woman said no? And “light bright?” So damn haunting. Spurlock repeats that he is “part of the problem,” but it’s clear from his Twitter feed that he hasn’t quite learned from his mistakes, as he is only retweeting positive messages from people lauding him for his “bravery” and “courage.”

He might want to take another look at the tweets coming his way before he gets too self-congratulatory.