Life Parenting
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If you’ve ever walked away from a mess, we’re here to applaud you. Because it’s not an easy thing to do. You see a sink full of dishes, unmade beds, baskets of unfolded laundry, countertops that are no longer visible because of all the crap covering them, carpets that need a good vacuum — but not before all the toys are picked up first — and there’s that urge to clean. It’s not a fun feeling, obviously. It’s simply what your brain is telling you needs to get done. Because if you don’t do it, who else will?

But sometimes you have to look at the bombshell known as your home and just say, “F*ck it!” Just ask Renegade Mothering’s Janelle Hanchett. Not only does she practice what she preaches, and walks away from chaos, but she suggests that we should all do it. For no other reason than just because.

Look familiar? Sound familiar? Her kitchen might seem like a disaster zone to some, but to others, it’s just another Wednesday night. Dishes, glasses, pots, pans, bowls, jars, bottles, sippy cups, lunch bags, food containers and food covering every inch of counter might seem like a terrifying sight to behold, and if you’re in there all night making sure every pot is scrubbed, every counter is clean, and the sink is empty and shining, so be it. But sometimes you just need to take a deep breath, turn off the light, and walk away.

Again, that might sound easy to do, but for some it could be the toughest thing you do that day. Because, the guilt. Oh, the guilt that comes with it can overwhelm. Hanchett insists, however, that along with shrugging off duties, you should shrug off the guilty feelings that comes with that.

“I don’t feel guilty about it. I don’t feel a heavy weight of defeat,” she writes. “I feel more of a sense of F*CK IT, here we are. Today, I AM NOT DOING ANYTHING FOR YOU HUMANS OR THIS HOUSE.”

And that… listen… that sound you heard is moms everywhere. “Uh huh.”

If you’re to take anything away from Hanchett’s post, it’s these seven glorious words: “We’ll manage it later. We always do.”

Ahh, truer words were never spoken. The dishes and pots may be harder to clean because of the food dried up in them, but it’s not like you’re putting off your responsibilities forever; you’re simply avoiding temporarily. We’re humans, not robots, so if you want to leave a mess behind, or not pick up the constant clutter, so be it. The jobs will eventually get done. Just not yet. And that’s OK. Now, you just need to get to a place where “OK” is enough. With fewer expectations, comes less disappointment — with yourself and others. Doesn’t that sound good?