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Almost immediately after 13 Reasons Why debuted in 2017, Netflix had to up its content warnings after the mental health community, school boards and parents voiced their concern with the show. Now, after careful consideration, the streaming service and the creator of the series have decided to remove its most controversial scene.

After hearing from young people and getting advice from medical experts, Netflix took to Twitter on Monday to announce that they’d decided to edit out the pivotal yet painful scene in which Hannah takes her own life. Along with series creator Brian Yorkey, Netflix determined that the scene could be removed without impacting the overall story. The scene in question showed Hannah sitting in a bathtub, contemplating everything, then, in great detail, take her own life. Based on the best-selling novel by Jay Asher, 13 Reasons Why chronicles the reasons why high school student Hannah Baker (Katherine Langford) decided to take her own life. Leaving behind 13 cassettes for the 13 people whose actions played a part in her tragic end, we watch Hannah’s story unfold through her classmate Clay (Dylan Minnette) — and it’s devastating.

“We’ve heard from many young people that 13 Reasons Why encouraged them to start conversations about difficult issues like depression and suicide and get help — often for the first time,” Netflix said in their statement. “As we prepare to launch Season 3 later this summer, we’ve been mindful about the ongoing debate around the show. So on the advice of medical experts, including Dr. Christine Moutier, chief medical officer at the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, we’ve decided with creator Brian Yorkey and the producers to edit the scene in which Hannah takes her own life from Season 1.”

Yorkey followed up on Netflix’s statement with one of his own.

Hannah seemed like any typical teenage girl — or what one would presume a typical teen is like. But that instantly changed as the series went on and, knowing the outcome, her journey of humiliation and misery became increasingly horrific and heartbreaking. In spite of her attempts to carry on with a cheery hopefulness (hopeful cheeriness?), it made viewers so badly want the impossible: a different ending for her.

The bullying, cruelty, rapes, and the suicide itself are brutal and unrelenting. The directors and writers and producers and actors had to go there, to those extremes, not only to stay true to the book but to make an impact. Which it did. It’s a complicated, suspenseful, haunting story that, at times, manages to be surprisingly beautiful. It’s drama in the truest sense of the word; you don’t watch it looking for a happy ending because there’s no way that can happen. You watch simply because you can’t look away. The rawness of the show as it builds from — and to — tragedy, leaving literally every character in shambles, is riveting. But Netflix recognized that that rawness could have unintended consequences for some vulnerable viewers, and the danger in that far outweighed the artistic merit of what was shown on screen.

13 Reasons Why premiered in March 2017, and its second season followed 14 months later, complete with a warning before each episode. The third season is expected later this year.

If you or anyone you know is experiencing depression, anxiety or self-harm impulses, contact the Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention.