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We know this is going to be frustrating, but it turns we probably have it all wrong when it comes to milk.

For years, the word from Canadian dietary experts has always been to avoid whole fat milk (3.25 per cent) in favour of either skim or the 1 or 2 per cent varieties. Canada’s Food Guide even recommends that individuals not exceed the two per cent mark. But new research published in the journal Circulation found that people who drink whole fat milk are actually 46 per cent less likely to develop diabetes. That’s right, less likely.

The 15-year study saw researchers analyzing the blood of 3,333 adults aged 30 to 75. Those with higher levels of full fat dairy byproducts in their bodies were shown as less likely to develop diabetes than those who stuck with the low fat products.

That said, however, researchers warn these findings are preliminary and that it’s still too early to advise anyone to make the switch from skim to whole fat.

It is worth noting though that a separate study published in the American Journal of Nutrition earlier this year found whole fat dairy products were associated with yet another health benefit:

“Greater intake of high-fat dairy products, but not intake of low-fat dairy products, was associated with less weight gain,” the researchers report.

It’s like everything we thought we knew has been turned upside down.

So while we can’t advise anyone to go out and make the switch to whole fat dairy just yet, it looks like our obsession with cutting the fat might be a thing of the past.

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