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Ah, the proposal. It’s a moment many dream of from childhood, an event you will remember for the rest of your life, and sometimes, in the true essence of romance, a total surprise. Unexpected proposals are super cute, shocking, and can stir up a whirlwind of emotions, which, while adorable, can predictably cause some issues for the marriage to come. However, according to recent trends, engagements are reportedly not very surprising anymore and wedding experts are happy about it.

With only a third of wedding proposals in the United States actually being a surprise according to The Knot 2017 Jewelry & Engagement Study, it’s clear many couples are choosing to thoroughly plan out their future together before getting engaged. Twenty-five per cent of couples manage to discuss the whole idea of marriage at least two years before an engagement. Although you may miss the unexpected excitement of being swept off your feet as your partner gets down on one knee, it can actually be very beneficial to be able to commit to each other as a team.

“If you really stop and think about it, the idea that a life-changing commitment, such as a proposal, should be a surprise is a bit scary,” explained wedding planner Karen Norian. “More couples are also choosing to plan out their future together, as opposed to one partner springing a surprise on the other. That means that talk of engagement and marriage are almost always on the discussion table.”

To many, it’s pivotal to have specific discussions about life before walking down the aisle. The Knot concluded that 96% of partners talk openly about their beliefs behind children, 90 per cent bring up finances, and 80 per cent discuss sex and married life before the proposal.

“Understanding what the other person expects and hopes for their future is imperative to know before committing yourself to each other,” Norian said.

An engaged couple created a relationship contract