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Warning: You might not want to watch this while eating

Many people are willing to go to great lengths to lose weight, but this approach might be too much for even the most determined dieter to follow.

A new device currently being tested in the U.S. allows patients to pump the contents of their stomach out of their bodies and into a toilet or garbage can. And just like you’re probably expecting at this point, the way it works might make you feel a little queasy.

Called AspireAssist, the device is made up of a tube that is inserted into the stomach with a circular plastic port located on the outside of the body. A short time after a patient eats, they have the option of attaching an additional tube to the port on their abdomen, which then basically ejects the meal right back out of themselves (you can watch this process in the video above, but consider yourself warned).

The device doesn’t suck all of the contents of your stomach out though. It’s designed so that only about thirty per cent of the food gets siphoned out, leaving the remainder for your body to digest and benefit from.

After all, treadmills are for suckers.

As crazy as this all might sound, initial testing has found it to be safe and effective. According to a study published in the journal Gastroenterology, patients who used the device for one year lost a whopping 18.6 per cent of their total bodyweight. Those who underwent “lifestyle therapy”, by contrast, only dropped 5.9 per cent in the same time frame.

“There were no adverse effects of aspiration therapy on eating behavior and no evidence of compensation for aspirated calories with increased food intake,” the researchers wrote. “In a pilot study, aspiration therapy appears to be a safe and effective long-term weight loss therapy for obesity.”

Even though one study seems to check out though, not all doctors are convinced.

“I need to know that having this procedure doesn’t have long-term risks — nutritional risks, infection risks and so forth,” Bariatric Medical Institute Founder Dr. Yoni Freedhoff said. “And until that data exists, I look at this as interesting and worthy of future study but not something I am going to be rushing people out the door to go get.”

To learn more about AspireAssist and how it works, check out the video above.

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