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For a long time, people have considered Stonehenge to be a pretty amazing place — as they should.

To this day, nobody knows exactly what it is or why it was built. All we know is that it was constructed between 3000 B.C. and 2000 B.C., and remains one of the world’s most famous sites.

But what if we told you researchers discovered something else last week, and it’s so cool it would make Stonehenge seem like Snoozehenge?

Let us introduce “Superhenge.” At twelve times the size of its predecessor, it’s safe to say the “super” connotation here is justified. Researchers from the University of Bradford say the newly discovered monument consists of at least 90 stones, some of which stood 15 ft. high. The whole thing has a circumference of 1.5 kilometres!

Superhenge

So how did something so big go unnoticed for so long?

Well, for one, it was buried under three feet of dirt. Researchers used remote sensing technology to make the discovery, which was found only three kilometres away from world-famous Stonehenge. No pieces have been uncovered or removed yet, but if confirmed, this would be the largest neolithic monument in all of Britain.

There’s only one problem: Just like Stonehenge, nobody knows what it is or why it was built. Researchers have determined many of the stones were toppled over purposely, but they don’t know much else.

“This discovery of a major new stone monument, which has been preserved to a remarkable extent, has significant implications for our understanding of Stonehenge and its landscape setting,” said Professor Vincent Gaffney of the University of Bradford, who co-led the research, in a statement. “Not only does this new evidence demonstrate a completely unexpected phase of monumental architecture at one of the greatest ceremonial sites in prehistoric Europe, the new stone row could well be contemporary with the famous Stonehenge sarsen circle or even earlier.”

In other words, Prof. Gaffney doesn’t know what this thing is…yet.

Unfortunately, there aren’t yet plans to excavate the site, so don’t expect any tours to be offered anytime soon. You can check out a video of the discovery right here.