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Have you ever missed out on an opportunity because of something you said in the past? In an era with an endless flow of public information and a millennial obsession with keeping “receipts” of past drama, is anything off limits? Apparently not for Kevin Hart or Nick Cannon.

Hart found out the hard way that what’s put on the internet stays on the internet, when old homophobic tweets of his were reposted last week to much public backlash. The tweets, which have since been taken down but are documented in screenshots, include lines like “Yo if my son comes home & try’s to play with my daughter’s doll house I’m going to break it over his head & say n my voice ‘Stop that’s gay’”, and that someone’s profile picture “look like a gay bill board for AIDS”. The heat was so strong that he chose to step down as this year’s host for the 91st Academy Awards, writing on Twitter that he doesn’t “want to be a distraction on a night that should be celebrated by so many amazing talented artists”.

He also apologized on Twitter after originally refusing to in an Instagram post when requested by the Academy.

But another comedian is speaking out against the backlash – and using female comics to do it. Nick Cannon took to Twitter on Friday and quote-tweeted old tweets from Chelsea Handler, Sarah Silverman and Amy Schumer.

He also hit back at a Twitter user who noted that Cannon should audit his tweets to not face the same fate as Hart, writing “Nope!! You know I’ve been saying f**ked up sh*t since twitter started! I don’t play that politically correct bullsh*t! F*ck politics!! Only Truth!”

Cannon was quick to congratulate Hart on his hosting gig on Instagram.

Hart addressed his homophobic tweets and comedy bits in a 2015 interview with Rolling Stone where he talked about his biggest fear being his son turning out to be gay and his 2010 comedy special involving that topic. He said “I wouldn’t tell that joke today, because when I said it, the times weren’t as sensitive as they are now. I think we love to make big deals out of things that aren’t necessarily big deals, because we can.”