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While all of us in North America were sleeping, Kim Jong Un was busy in North Korea making history again, this time doubling down on the promises his critics (so most people outside of North Korea) doubt he will follow through on. This week, South Korean President Moon Jae-in made a historic trip north of the border for a three-day summit hosted by Kim in Pyongyang, marking the third meeting between the two leaders.

Kim Jong Un Moon Jae-in meeting
Pyeongyang Press Corps/Pool/Getty Images

The last time Kim and Moon met, they made a big show about creating a new era of peace between their two states. There were huge photo-ops — Kim crossing the DMZ into South Korea, hand-holding, a parade, a tree-planting ceremony, etc. — and the whole thing culminated in Kim and Moon signing the Panmunjom Declaration for Peace, Prosperity and Unification on the Korean Peninsula. The document committed both countries to denuclearizing the entire Korean Peninsula and to formally signing a peace treaty to officially end the Korean War by next year.

At a press event Wednesday, the two leaders announced more details that certainly make it look like North Korea will be following through on its promises.

Not only did defense chiefs from both Koreas sign on to a 17-page accord agreeing to “cease all hostile acts against each other,” they also vowed to create several cultural changes to dispel the animosity between the two countries. Those pledges include drafting a joint bid to host the 2032 Summer Olympics, connecting the two nations with roads and railways in the next year, ceasing military drills aimed at one another, removing 11 guard positions from along the DMZ and working on the Mount Kumgang tourism project.

Kim Jong Un and Moon Jae-in signing peace agreement
Pyeongyang Press Corps/Getty Images

“The era of no war has started,” Moon announced, “Today the North and South decided to remove all threats that can cause war from the entire Korean Peninsula.”

Kim also agreed to close and destroy two key nuclear test sites and allow for “international experts” to inspect them afterwards. This feels like a huge step because there was substantial criticism a few months ago when Kim staged a theatrical press event where he invited international journalists to witness him “destroying” a nuclear site and offered the distant observation as proof it was adequately demolished.

There’s one rather large, Donald Trump-sized caveat though — Kim has agreed to those conditions if the United States takes reciprocal measures, something they have never made even the slightest indication they are willing to do.

“They have continuously shown their trust towards one another and I hope there will be another summit between the two countries as soon as possible,” Moon said of the U.S. and North Korea.

On Twitter, Trump was positive about the perceived progress. He made no mention, however, of the action the United States might have to take in order to make it happen.

When Kim met with Trump in Singapore in June, one of the major criticisms of the summit was that it concluded with the signing of a document that meant virtually nothing. It essentially just reaffirmed the Panmunjom Declaration between NK and SK and included nothing about what the U.S. would do with its nuclear arsenal or specifics about inspecting North Korea.

Bottom line: North Korea is seemingly willing to cooperate and denuclearize, but only if the United States is willing to do the same — something that is very, very unlikely.

Moon Jae-in and Kim Jong Un ride in parade
Pyeongyang Press Corps/Pool/Getty Images