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The International Space Station also happens to double as the best seat in the galaxy to watch the northern lights over Earth.

Fortunately, we have astronauts like Scott Kelly to share that view with us earthlings down below. And boy, the aurora borealis certainly looks cooler when viewed from the other side. Here’s a shot of the phenomenon over Canada, which he released last week:

Kelly is currently on a year-long mission aboard the space station to study how prolonged exposure to zero gravity can affect the body. But just like Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield before him, he’s been constantly sharing his stunning views from space via social media.


For those who aren’t aware, the aurora borealis occurs when charged particles from the sun react with gases in the Earth’s atmosphere. The different-coloured lights are created when various particles collide with each other.

The dance of #aurora. #YearInSpace #northernlights #space #spacestation #iss #cosmos #lights

A photo posted by Scott Kelly (@stationcdrkelly) on

More morning’s #aurora! #YearInSpace #green #glow #northernlights #space #spacestation #iss

A photo posted by Scott Kelly (@stationcdrkelly) on


The best part of Kelly’s experience, though, is that he gets to see the show over and over again. Here’s an image he captured more than two months ago:

The northern lights aren’t the only stand out images the astronaut has been sharing though. Kelly also captured images of Winter Storm Jonas as it hovered ominously above the U.S. East Coast.

All we can say is: Keep up the good work, Kelly!