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Meghan Markle admittedly had to leave lots behind in order to marry into the royal family. There’s probably also a lot of protocol to follow, rules to obey, Instagrams to delete… and on top of it all, a dress code to adhere to. While she might be missing non-nude nail polish, we can bet that Meghan’s probably not letting this rule bother her too much: strict etiquette says unmarried women can’t wear tiaras.

So unlike her sister-in-law to be, Kate Middleton — who is often seen sporting such tiaras at special events like this State Banquet at Buckingham Palace on day one of the Spanish State Visit:

Getty Images

or at the annual Diplomatic Reception at Buckingham Palace in 2016:

Getty Images

— Meghan won’t be sporting a tiara any time before her wedding to Prince Harry on May 19. Not that you were looking out for that tiara, were you?

Richard Fitzwilliams, Royal expert told The Independent: “No one would expect Meghan to wear a tiara before she marries into the royal family. It is, however, thought she might [be] leant or gifted a tiara for her wedding by the Queen as Kate and Sophie Wessex and Zara Phillips were.”

According to tradition in the UK, the crowns are seen much like wedding bands — in other words, they’re symbols of betrothal. Once a woman has found the man of her dreams, a shiny, bright bejeweled tiara signifies that she’s off the market. Sure, it sounds a little antiquated, but we do still live in a time of Kings and Queens, so.

One thing Markle will have in common with Duchess Kate, Queen Elizabeth II and Princess Diana? She’ll likely be carrying myrtle down the aisle as part of her bouquet. And not just any myrtle, royal 170-year-old myrtle — grown in the Isle of Wight, a gift given by Prince Albert’s grandmother to Queen Victoria. The evergreen shrub symbolizes love and marriages.

But will Meghan dazzle us all in a tiara on her wedding day? Guess we’ll find out in May.