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Barbie has to be more careful of the image she projects than Kim Kardashian as she sidesteps Kanye’s most recent public TMZ freakout. There seems to be constant controversy swirling around the 11-and-a-half-inch-tall plastic doll, and the latest misstep from Mattel has some people wondering what the toy manufacturer was thinking releasing its latest product.

Over the weekend, the Barbie-fuelled Insta account @barbiestyle posted a photo promoting a new doll doc on Hulu. The photo featured two white-skinned dolls with light hair and one black-skinned doll with half cornrows and half blonde hair and was captioned with: “Movie night with my girls to watch the @Hulu premiere of the new @Barbie documentary, Tiny Shoulders: Rethinking Barbie!”

A post shared by Barbie® (@barbiestyle) on

Almost immediately, the internet was ablaze in backlash because of the black doll’s half-cornrows-half-blown-out-blonde hairstyle.

Though some did come to the doll’s defence, saying it was a style they actually liked and wore themselves.

Plus, there are a handful of other black Barbie dolls that haven’t caused as much controversy:

A post shared by Barbie® (@barbiestyle) on

A post shared by Barbie® (@barbiestyle) on

But the hairstyle on the doll giant’s latest seems to have been a poor calculation. Maybe run it by a few more people on the Barbie Hair Styling Team before sending it to market? You know how cut-throat it is out here, Mattel.

The toy company has been attempting to mitigate the negative press–outrageous and unrealistic body proportions, offensive careers, lack of diversity–around its decades-old doll in recent years. In 2016, the brand launched a collection of Barbies in varying body types and skin colours. And while 1980 was the first push for a black Barbie, the “tall and curvy” and “petite and curvy” dolls were a first.

Kids and adults reacted to the new Barbie collection in raw, honest and welcoming ways, clearly marking a desire for an inclusive line of toys.

While this latest doll’s ‘do might have missed the mark, at the very least, Mattel does seem to be making an effort to market its toys to the masses.