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Professor X once said that “mutation is the key to our evolution,” and it looks like some people took him very seriously.

Right now, there are people all over the world who exist as living, breathing experiments. Guinea pigs that test the limits of just how much technology you can pack into the human body, with the ultimate goal of mutating ourselves to fast-forward evolution.

It’s called “biohacking.” And people are coming up with all sorts of ways to do it.

Back in 2014, for example, Vancouver resident Nikolas Badminton had a tiny microchip (about the size of two grains of rice) implanted beneath the skin between his left thumb and index finger. While there’s no visible lump, scanning the area with a cellphone reveals Badminton’s personal identification details.

“It contains a very small amount of information so you could actually put a website URL on there or a phone number, your email, or whatever,” Badminton says in the video above, referring to his microchip as a “virtual transferable business card.”

But a chip that holds a little information digitally is just the tip of the biohacking iceberg. A company in Sweden is already experimenting with microchips it implanted in several of its staff that are able to open doors with a wave of the hand, print files securely and even communicate with mobile phones, according to the CBC. There was also a man in California who dripped a chlorophyll solution into his eyes in order to grant himself night vision (it worked, apparently).

Another person, who says he’s from Hungary, became a real life Magneto after he implanted a magnet in his finger and posted a video of its effects on YouTube.

With all that said, we figure it’s only a matter of time before they’re implanting microchips that can do things like this:

Giphy

Or this:

Wolverine

This would come in pretty handy:

Storm

Heck, if the technology is available anyway

Juggernaut

While we may not be at X-Men levels of mutation just yet, we don’t seem to be that far off. Implanted microchips were once something reserved for the world of science fiction. Plus, in the future, Badminton believes biohacking could be used to create GPS implants to track lost Alzheimer’s patients or to create exoskeletons with brain censors to replace wheelchairs.

Personally though, we’d take the Wolverine claws any day.