Life Parenting
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It’s one thing to laugh at celebrities and politicians who read mean tweets about themselves. But hearing kids read similar insults is an entirely different, heartbreaking story.

The video, created by the Canadian Safe School Network, starts off with teens smiling along with the insults, even shrugging them off. But the laugh track quickly disappears and as the tweets get meaner and meaner, the silence becomes deafening. The last girl walks off near tears after she reads a message that tells her to go kill herself.

 

There aren’t too many things that are worse than being bullied. And nowadays, it’s rampant for young people, be it on the playground or hallways, or via social media in the privacy in one’s own home. The Canadian Safe School Network is a non-profit organization dedicated to reducing youth violence and making our schools and communities safer.

Almost one in 10 Canadian teens say they have been victims of online bullying on social networking sites. That’s eight per cent! Sure, we see bullying in real life but the cyber stuff is more difficult to spot.

If you believe someone you know is a cyberbullying victim, there’s a lot you can do to help. First off, remind your friend that it’s not their fault, and they don’t deserve it. If things are getting completely out of control, it can be reported to the social network or digital carrier and he/she needs to speak to a trusted adult like a parent or teacher. And as far as friends go, always check in on them and make sure he/she knows you are supporting them.

As far as physical threats go, aside from an adult, bring in the police. Someone’s safety is on the line so it should never be thought of as “tattling” or “snitching.” But if you’re still unsure of what to do, Kids Help Phone (online or 1-800-668-6868) can always provide you with solutions or even just someone to talk to.

An Indiegogo campaign has been set up to help the Canadian Safe School Network raise funds to spread their important, life-saving message to a larger audience. At the very least, share this video as it can be the very resource families need to help stop this epidemic.