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In their ongoing effort to eradicate violence against animals by humans, the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) has released a list of “common phrases that perpetuate violence toward animals” and contrasting “animal-friendly language” you can teach your kids instead.

In a post on their website, PETA offers a collection of flash cards directed at children to teach them these kinder alternatives to commonly-used animal-related idioms. They suggest replacing, “kill two birds with one stone” with “feed two birds with one scone,” “beat a dead horse” with “feed a fed horse,” and “bring home the bacon” with “bring home the bagels” among others. The organization even changed their Twitter display name to “PETA: Bringing Home the Bagels Since 1980” to offer an example of the phrase’s versatility.

While the argument for not perpetuating violence by children against animals is valid, PETA didn’t end its reasoning there. On Twitter, the organization took the logic a step further by comparing the use of these common phrases to hateful slurs used against marginalized groups.

“Just as it became unacceptable to use racist, homophobic, or ableist language, phrases that trivialize cruelty to animals will vanish as more people begin to appreciate animals for who they are and start ‘bringing home the bagels’ instead of the bacon,” they wrote.

When you think about it, a lot of these idioms actually are quite violent — killing birds, skinning cats, beating horses — and reassessing how we use language and who that language might inadvertently hurt is important. However, the direct comparison between these phrases and racist or homophobic slurs might be a bridge too far. We see your point, but the dehumanization of groups of marginalized people should be given a little more weight than a flashcard lesson plan about being kind to animals.

Of course, the internet quickly polarized itself with some people totally on board with the animal-friendly lexical changes and others going off on PETA for once again ruining something that was just fine thank you very much.

PETA responded to some of the backlash on Twitter — doubling down on the slur comparison by calling their new animal-friendly phrases “anti-speciesist” — and encouraged followers to continue sharing their own new idioms.