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Online clothing shop Boohoo has found themselves in some rather hot water. According to its website, the British retailer has been using a size-six model to promote its plus-sized clothing line, in which sizes range from from 12 to 24.

What what what what?

Earlier this week, shoppers took to Twitter to point out that the blonde model in question, wearing a frilly white-and-pink bikini top from the BooHoo Plus line, looked slightly slimmer than someone who traditionally wears a size 12 or above.

On the Boohoo website, the model’s size is listed as a six, as screen capped by one user:

How on earth are regular women supposed to feel confident in their skin when a brand won’t even take a stand to photograph and promote full-figured models in their plus-size line? Not to mention, it’s already wildly frustrating when trying to figure out how something purchased online will fit IRL, and showing a model who’s not a size 12 sport plus-size looks just doesn’t make sense, if this is in fact true.

The same model is seen in various plus-sized items, including a jumpsuit and trousers with her measurement listed as a size six on the website.

You’ve got to hope that this is an unfortunate typo and someone forgot to type a “1″ before the “6.”

Jen Eastwood from Free to Be OK, a body-positive campaign and collective, isn’t sure.

“The use of non-plus models to represent plus-size lines encourages body dysmorphia, especially when [Boohoo’s] target market is largely young women vulnerable and impressionable to marketing,” Eastwood told Yahoo Style.

And it’s not just this model that has people feeling the rage. Free to Be OK slammed Boohoo for adding a “fat tax” to their plus-size line. Basically, certain plus-size garments are priced slightly higher than straight-size ones.

Boohoo has yet to publicly comment on the whole kerfuffle, but if there’s one thing the internet does well, it’s make a stink until change occurs.