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The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have been serving looks all over Oceania for 11 days now and they don’t seem to be stopping anytime soon (although, logically, they only have five days left on their Royal Tour). Friday morning, the couple began their last day in the island nation of Tonga by visiting the Faonelua Centre with Princess Angelika Latufuipeka for a special exhibition of Tongan handicrafts.

At the market, Harry and Meghan donned matching floral garlands and traditional wraps called Faka Ha'apai made of Fa and Puatonga flowers.

The Sussexes then traveled to the oldest secondary school in the Pacific, Tupou College (founded in 1866), to meet with students and dedicate two reserves within the school’s on-campus forests to The Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy. This dedication will be the royals’ third addition to the Canopy – a series of forests around the global Commonwealth designated by the crown for conservation – while on their tour.

There were also traditional performances by the students to commemorate the event.

Immediately after the ceremony, Harry and Meghan paid a final visit to the King and Queen of Tonga at The Royal Palace before heading back to Sydney for their evening itinerary.

Back in Australia, Harry and Meghan ditched the casual wear (if you can call what they wear to daytime events “casual”) for formal evening wear to attend the Australian Geographic Society Awards. The Duke and Duchess presented youth awards at the event which honours the best in exploration, science and conservation.

Meghan looked absolutely stunning in an Oscar De La Renta black and white tulle evening gown with tweed bird details.

The royals presented two awards over the course of the night. Harry presented Jade Hameister – a the youngest person to ski both the North and South Poles at the age of 16 – with the Young Adventurer of the Year Award. Then Meghan presented the Young Conservationist of the Year Award to Sophia Skarparis for her work banning plastic bags in New South Wales.

Harry also gave a brief address about the importance of conservation now more than ever.

“My father and others have been speaking about the environment for decades,” he said. “Not basing it on fallacy or ‘New Age hypothesis,’ but written in science and fact and the sobering awareness of our environmental vulnerability.”

“We are all here tonight because we care about using the world’s resources wisely and safeguarding them for future generations,” the Duke continued. “I am certain we are more aware of the need for this balance now than ever before. We must appreciate our planet and what it has to offer.”

Harry also collected an award from the Australian Geographical Society on behalf of his grandmother, the Queen. Her Majesty was honoured for the conservation efforts she and the Royal family have undertaken with The Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy project.