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Thursday afternoon, after 14 hours of deliberation, the jury returned with a verdict in Bill Cosby’s retrial for the sexual assault of Canadian basketball player and university administrator Andrea Constand. They found the comedian guilty on three counts of sexual assault against Ms. Constand, with each count holding a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison. At 80 years-old, Cosby could be sentenced to up to 30 years behind bars. Sentencing will be determined by a judge based on three types of psychological evaluation.

Other alleged victims of the comedian were in the courtroom as the verdict was read, and there were tears and cheering before security warned the women to quiet down or leave. Five of those women had been permitted to testify during the trial and have said they see the guilty ruling as a win for themselves as well.

Cosby did not go silently, however. After the verdict was read out, a discussion followed about whether Cosby is a flight risk and whether he should be kept in custody or allowed to return home to await sentencing. Bail was set at $1 million but the prosecutor on the case argued that Cosby is a flight risk and said that he could potentially flee on his private plane.

Cosby hit back quickly, yelling, “He doesn’t have a plane, you asshole.”

In a press conference following the verdict, Andrea Constand’s lawyer Dolores Troiani spoke on her client’s behalf while Constand looked on.

“I am so happy today that I can say — although justice was delayed, it was not denied,” Troiani said, “It took a lot of courage for [Constand] to come back and to do this. There are so many people who have expressed their admiration for her. Millions, and I do mean millions, of people have admired her courage, admired her calm and admired her demeanor.”

Attorney Gloria Allred, who represents 33 of Cosby’s other accusers, also addressed the press. She called the verdict – which is the first of the Me Too era – “herstoric.”

“In the beginning, many were not believed,” she said, “We are so happy that finally we can say: women are believed and not only on #MeToo but in a court of law where they were under oath, where they testified truthfully . . . where there were attempts to discredit them. And after all is said and done, women were finally believed.”

The gratefulness and joy of the accusers was reflected and amplified by scores of women (and men) on social media who also hoped that the verdict might bring some peace to the other accusers who won’t get a court date.

Other people pointed out that while the guilty verdict is a win for the Me Too movement, it is nowhere near the end of the fight. There are millions of women who have spoken out in the months since Harvey Weinstein’s misconducts broke this whole thing open. Yes, women are being believed more than ever before, but only one high-profile case has gone to trial. And it took TWO trials just to see a guilty verdict.

Realists pointed out further that there is a racial component to this case as well. While it is incredible that a powerful man who used his position of fame to intimidate women into silence has been found guilty, it is unlikely that Weinstein, Kevin Spacey or Matt Lauer will see the inside of a court room. Others offered even more of a reality check by pointing out that there are still gross injustices in the American (and all) legal systems and that the law doesn’t function in the way it was intended to for marginalized groups of people. This is a historic day for women, but so many others will never see the same triumph of justice.

Then there was the opposition, who still believe Cosby to be innocent and accused the women of lying to smear the star and get paid. Cosby’s public relations team was in top gear, calling the trial a “public lynching,” comparing the case to that of Emmett Till and again reiterating that all 60 women who have made accusations against Cosby must be lying.

The criticism continued online with people suggesting that the women just wanted fame. Farther along the spectrum, there were also people who theorized that the Me Too movement is a “gender war against men.”

And here, here are the women who just learned that a jury found their abuser guilty.