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When his fiancee Laura Gallacher was pregnant, Russell Brand studied for his new role as a father very seriously, saying “I read a different book every week and I read one on preparation for fatherhood to mentally prepare me for it,” The 41 year old performer and activist was clearly nervous and excited, “I don’t know that it has prepared me for it. I’ve painted the room, I’ve done the things that you’re supposed to do, I’ve accepted the idea that that person will be more important than me.”

Since his daughter Mabel–He “stared at her for ages to make sure she looked like that name”–was born in November 2016, Brand has opened up about how he sees her path, and it’s clear he wants no limits for his daughter. In an interview with his old friend and talk show host Jonathan Ross, before Mabel was born, Brand revealed, “We don’t know the gender. I may not even ever impose a gender upon it, let the child grow up and be the whatever the hell it is, never tell it there is such a concept.”

It’s not a new concept. The idea of raising our daughters and sons with the freedom to be who they are has become noticeably more prevalent, along with teenagers aligning with broader sexual preferences and identifications. It’s a new generation, and Brand is keen to be part of the growing trend; unsurprising given his open mindedness and his ability to embrace and then share his ideas on a more expansive world vision. So how have things changed for him since he found out the sex of his child?

“Now that I have these very important women in my life (referring to his fiancee and his daughter) I have re-evaluated the way I look at gender,” he said. “I don’t have to dress her in feminine clothes, I don’t need to dress her in clothes for her gender, I’d rather just see how she formulates it herself.”

It’s a big turnaround for someone who has had the label “misogynist” thrown at him for his previous treatment of women. Having a daughter has clearly opened his eyes to how the world treats girls, and that’s a good thing as he’s a highly vocal advocate for change.

These days, if you ask your friends who are expecting what color clothes to get for their child, specifically a female child, the answer is often “Not pink.” What happens then if the child herself becomes a pink fanatic? We get the feeling that Russell will embrace whoever Mabel decides she wants to be, and we expect to hear a lot more from him about his growing insights into parenting as he starts the long and exciting journey ahead!