Life Money
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • +
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email
SHARE THIS
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email

When you’re trying to climb that steep corporate ladder, there’s a lot of pressure to always be on the ball, contributing to the company and leading discussion. That can be an exciting challenge but it can also be totally exhausting. Sometimes we just need a break, but does that mean completely falling off your boss’s radar?

Never fear, hardworking corporate employees. Twitter has your back. In order to advance in a company, you obviously need to prove you have the skills to lead in your field, but every once in a while, you can sit back and say a few choice words without fear of losing face with your superiors or among your peers. British comedian Adam Hess suggested on Twitter last week that a well-placed “It’s all about finding that balance” in an office meeting will do wonders for your workplace cred.

That offering got the Twittersphere talking about other buzz words and phrases you can pipe up with in a meeting to draw just the right kind of attention to yourself. You don’t have to be the Idea Man/Woman, you just need to be the one who makes the conversation more cohesive or encourages people to approach problems from a different angle.

What started out as a Twitter joke, quickly turned into a cheat sheet for office meetings.

Additionally, expressing that the session was either “productive” or that your methods need to be “streamlined” are good ways to end a meeting on the right note. Even being the one who expresses that your meetings need more “focus” is a good way to show you were engaged and thinking about “strategy.”

Despite all the helpful work advice he prompted, Adam Hess doesn’t seem to be too thrilled that people jumped on to his initial statement about “finding that balance.” After several users offered their own foolproof meeting interjections, Hess replied to his own tweet saying that his initial point was completely misunderstood and then threatened to report everyone – using a phrase that works well in a meeting that goes south.

Do you have a go-to office phrase?

Tags: