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After the backlash over her Ghost in the Shell casting, you would think Scarlett Johnasson might be a little more careful when selecting and accepting future roles. Apparently not. It was announced this week that the cisgender actress would be taking on the role of a transgender man in the upcoming film Rub & Tug. 

The role in question is that of real-life Pittsburgh crime boss Dante “Rex” Gill who ran a chain of massage parlours as a front for a prostitution ring in the 1970s. Gill was born Lois Jean Gill but identified as a man and asked people to call him “Mr. Gill.” His 2003 obituary states that “she may even have undergone the initial stages of a sex change that made her appear masculine.”

The backlash for Johansson taking the role that could have gone to an actual transgender man was quick.

People were also quick to point out that Rub & Tug is set to be directed by Rupert Sanders — the very same director who was accused of whitewashing for casting Johansson as an Asian character in The Ghost in the Shell. Begging the question: if you make the same mistake twice, is it really a mistake?

In response to the controversy, Johansson was defiant. She doubled down on her choice to take the role and deflected by directing critics to take up their complaints with other cis actors who have played transgender characters. Her argument highlights one of the main issues with the way Hollywood represents minorities — they don’t. The real root of the issue is that marginalized groups are rarely permitted to tell their own stories and are often blocked out of Hollywood altogether (for a deep-dive on that, check out Bustle‘s take).

Some commentators have come out in defense of Johansson, making the counterargument that if only transgender actors can take on transgender roles, that implies that LGBT actors cannot take on straight roles and that actors can only play parts that they align with perfectly in race, gender, sexuality, etc. The argument overlooks the fact that minorities have historically been underrepresented and whitewashed in media with very little progress toward adequate representation.

People also pushed back against the defense by pointing out that casting a woman in drag as a transgender man oversimplifies the trans experience. It reduces the complexity of gender identity and shows little respect for the real-life person who wished to be known as a man.