Health Nutrition
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It’s no secret that childhood obesity is an ever-growing concern in North America. And according to an advocate for ending obesity, it’s time that parents start paying up.

Tam Fry, a leading figure from the National Obesity Forum in the U.K., has recently suggested that paying kids to eat their greens would be a huge step in quelling the obesity crisis.

According to Fry, money provides a strong incentive when encouraging kids to eat their veggies.

“It is a tangible reward for children eating their vegetables but allows them to understand the value of money and how to save it for later in life,” said Fry.

Rather than forking over wads of cash alongside a plate of broccoli, Tam suggests depositing small amounts of money into a bank account for the child that will slowly build over time. Think of it as earning mealtime allowance.

“If the children eat their vegetables and accumulate enough money, they could then buy themselves a small gift,” Fry stated.

But before dishing out reward after reward to your kids, remember one thing: the money earned is not for spending on junk food, nor is junk food to be given as a reward.

Fry’s suggestion comes at a time when a solution for obesity is desperately needed. According to a 2015 study, 13 per cent of Canadian children and adolescents are considered obese. So giving up some cash for the health of a child might be the solution we’ve all been waiting for.

For parents of picky eaters who prefer chicken fingers and fries over Brussels sprouts and broccoli (no judgment here – we’re all a tad guilty), Fry’s solution might be worth a try.

“Green vegetables have a bitter taste to children, but they must understand from an early age that not everything is sweet,” said Fry.

And even if the whole eating veggies thing doesn’t stick, here’s to hoping it’ll at least be a valuable lesson in saving and handling money responsibly.