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The Takeout recently asked a question that I feel we’ve all had to answer at one point in our lives: “You’re making a sandwich and you pull a piece of bread out of the bag. There’s a spot of mould on it. Do you cut the mould off and still eat it, or do you throw the piece (and the rest of that loaf) away?”

Their writer answered with this advice:

“You should have thrown the whole thing away. As this upsetting video from Tech Insider reveals, no part of moldy bread is safe. That’s because ‘Mold is a type of fungus. Like a mushroom, it has a vast number of roots—called hyphae—that spread beneath the visible surface. Therefore, the whole piece of bread is riddled with mold.’ Oh god. Then because mold is made from spores that fly around, it’s likely that the rest of the loaf is infected as well, and some of that mold can be pretty unhealthy to take in. I’m just not going stop think about all the times I’ve just cut out the mold from my bread, or grabbed a different piece from the same loaf. Anyway, at least now you and I know better.”

But if the writer did stop to consider all the times she ate bread that she’d removed a little mould from and was just fine afterwards, does that change anything? I’m not suggesting that all mould is safe but I’ve never gotten sick from doing this, and neither has the writer. That’s TWO whole people. That’s how science works, right?

Rest assured, I haven’t removed mould from bread in a while but not because I’m afraid of getting sick. It’s mostly because in my house bread doesn’t stay around long enough to grow mould in the first place.

Also, there’s a good chance that mouldy bread will also be stale bread and that is simply unacceptable. I mean, if it’s hot dogs for dinner and the buns can be revitalized with some light grilling and a small mould extraction, I’m good to go. Same goes for Cheddar: if you remove a little mould from a chunk, the cheese will still be delicious.

But I don’t think the same can be said for stale bread slices. They will just produce a sad sack of a sandwich.

Or really good croutons, minus the mould.