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Remember when we just used to have to worry about flat tummies, big boobs and round butts? These days, it’s all about A4 waists (as in, comparing our waist sizes to paper stock) and #ThighGaps. It’s enough to make you want to head on over to the local grocery store and clean them out of every clearance Easter chocolate on the rack.

When it comes to that elusive gap between the thighs that social media has been pushing lately though, it seems we haven’t heard the end of it. That’s thanks to TGAP, a company that’s come out with revolutionary thigh-gap jewelry. And we thought belly chains were where it stopped.

If you click through the site, you’ll see that there are six different models made with 18-karat gold-plated sterling silver that retail between $175-$195.

TGAP

Mad yet? Just wait. It’s when you actually go to purchase the chains that you’re redirected to the site’s about section, where the true mission of the chains is displayed in full.

“TGap Jewellery is a fictional company that sells jewelleries designed for thigh gaps. It is launched to catalyze a debate on unrealistic body image social media portrays,” the site reads.

Scroll down a little more and there are some fun facts about body image, info on why some women actually have thigh gaps (it all has to do with bone structure) and links to support groups that help to foster a positive body image.

It was all started by Singapore design student Soo Kyung Bae, who wanted to call attention to the issue and raise awareness about the dangers of striving for unrealistic bodies.

“Thigh gap represents one of the first few trends regarding body ideals the media has popularised,” she told Dezeen. “It clearly demonstrates media’s power on influencing one’s perception of body image.”

When the site first launched in late March, Bae had a lot of angry website viewers. But as the truth of what she was doing began to dawn on people, she says people became more appreciative. After all, we only have one body. And while there’s taking care of it and treating it like a temple, there’s also a point of obsession that too many of us sadly reach. Thanks to sites like this, hopefully we can all feel a little better about ourselves the next time we overindulge or you know… have a full meal.

Maybe we’ll leave that old Easter candy on the shelves after all.