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As much as dining and dashing may seem like a smart idea, ever stop to think of how the expenses get covered? We’ve all heard the horror stories about employees having to pay for restaurant goers who skip out on the bill–stories that may unfortunately hold more truth than myth.

Recently, the owner of Kum Koon Garden, a Chinese food restaurant, ordered Indigenous diners to pay for the meal before it was even served. He also told CTV News that his employees have to pay if a customer doesn’t, so it’s no surprise that the issue of employees rights came into question.

“You could never, in a work place, deduct any shortages, including the dine and dash situation from an employee’s wages,” said Jay Short, who investigates employment standards in Manitoba. “Quite frequently, there’s a pool of tips that the employer would often use to not only cover things like dine and dashes but to try and pay servers plus kitchen staff and other places in the work place.” In other words, although morally questionable, it is legal for restaurant owners to deduct from employees tips (just not their wages). But why should employees suffer when someone else steals from a restaurant?

Charles Garcia, manager at Teo’s Restaurant, sums it up nicely: “Obviously it’s not anyone’s fault other than the people running who are not wanting to pay their bill.” But money makes the world go round and, unfortunately, the money’s gotta come from somewhere.

Watch the video above to learn more about what happens when restaurant goers dine and dash.