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It was a tough night for correctional officers Susan Hayre and Sharnjit Gill on The Amazing Race Canada. When the teams travelled from Toronto to Chile, a selfie-mural challenge tripped the female-power team up and put them completely behind the pack. In the end, they landed on the mat just behind Gino and Jesse to become the second team eliminated from the race.

Meanwhile, engaged couple Hamilton and Michaelia completely broke away from the pack when they won two express passes, using one of them to completely bypass a complex dancing challenge and land themselves six free months of gas from Petro-Canada and two Air Canada economy tickets to New Delhi, India.

We caught up with Susan and Sharnjit to find out what went wrong, whether their selfie skills have since improved (we sure hope so, yikes) and what being an “alpha female” actually means.

How is Jon’s poker face? Was it obvious what was coming?

Gill: “No, he has a really good poker face. I think he’s mastered three seasons worth of poker face for sure.”

How far behind Gino and Jesse were you?

Hayre: “We actually saw them leave as we were getting there so we kind of had a feeling that it was close; we just didn’t know how close.”

Do you still have those selfies?

Hayre: “No. But they’re in our memories now for sure.”

Gill: “I think if we did have them, we wouldn’t even be in the selfies because we took such bad ones!”

What was the first thing you guys did after you were eliminated?

Hayre: “We pretty much giggled. We reminisced about our last task, when we were doing the dancing. That was about it. And we hugged each other.”

What was your proudest, and maybe not-so proudest moment of the Race?

Gill: “My proudest moment was actually jumping off the plank off the first leg, just because I can’t swim. So that was a huge fear for me, and I conquered it [on] the very first leg. I had to imagine my kids in the water, because even though my brain was telling me to jump, my body would not go through with what my mind was telling it to do. My not-so proudest moment is not being able to take a good selfie. I really suck at selfies.”

Hayre: “My proudest moment was when we reached the community centre and painted with one of the kids there, the girl. That really hit home, because we have kids of our own. It was so nice to do something for children who are less fortunate and don’t have some of the things that we take home to our kids pretty much every day. The not-so proudest moment was not being able to take something as simple as a selfie. We take a thousand pictures of ourselves on a daily basis and for us not to be able to take a simple selfie in front of a mural…yeah.”

Do you have a selfie stick now?

Gill: “No! I will go buy one though, my kids will school me on how to use the selfie stick. I really do suck at taking selfies.”

 

You consider yourselves “alpha females,” but what does that mean to you?

Gill: “For us, we’re very strong women. We’re correctional officers, we’re moms, sisters. I feel like we encompass that role every woman has, and we love motivating other women that feel like they can’t. And it’s also cultural, too. I mean, we’re both East Indian, we’re minorities, so we’ve always had to fight and prove ourselves, not just with our culture but even in the job that we do; it was a very male-dominated job before. Now, there are more females. It has turned us into strong, alpha females: We know what we want, we know how to get there, we will make it happen, but it is a challenge for us.”

Other than selfies, what was the hardest moment overall?

Hayre: “For both of us, it was probably when we were painting with the little girl at the community centre. Something that Sharn and I were talking about before the race was that we wanted to take our kids away to India, where they can see kids who are less fortunate than them. When we got to the centre and saw this girl, it just hit home for us and we were so emotionally wrecked. We just started tearing up.”

Gill: “It made us miss our kids more. I have a daughter that’s the age of the little girl that was helping me, and she’s always asking me to do arts and crafts. To me that was a very, very emotional moment, and I couldn’t stop crying because every time I looked at this little girl, all I saw was my little daughter, and me not taking the time.”

Is there anything you’d do differently next time?

Gill: “Learn how to take better selfies?!”

Hayre: “That’s pretty much what killed us. So, yeah.”

Which team are you really hoping will win?

Gill: “We would love to see another female team win this so we’re rooting for our girls from Labrador, Dana and Amanda.”

You’re still in the race for the Fuel Your Team fan prize, any last words for voters?

Gill: “Yes! Just because we’re out doesn’t mean we’re not still in, so please support us by voting for us so that we can drive our kids all over Canada. That would be an experience.”

The Amazing Race Canada airs Wednesdays at 9 p.m. ET on CTV and CTV Go.