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Many schools encourage parents to pack healthy options for their children’s lunches and snacks, and we are all for it. But when that encouragement turns into over-the-top policing and shaming, it can make one want to reach for the nearest chocolate bar — both to stress-eat and to put in our kid’s lunch out of spite. Because for moms and dads, it can be tough sending kids the “right” foods, what with all the allergies and restrictions and rules to remember.

But raisins? That’s crossing some sort of line, isn’t it?

Well, that’s what happened to a mother in Australia, who was stunned to get a note from her daughter’s teachers, stating they found the raisins she sent unacceptable.

The mom first shared the note on a closed Facebook group, but was permitted to post it by another mom. “Please help us to encourage nutritious eating habits in children. Our healthy eating policy asks you to provide healthy and nutritious snacks for your child to eat at kindy,” the note read. “The sultanas packed for your child today are unacceptable at kindy due to its high sugar content.”

What the hell? RAISINS?! Unless they’re covered in chocolate (mmmm), then we don’t see the problem. Also, the letter clearly states that dried fruit is acceptable. And of course the sugar content is high; it’s a fruit! But it’s a natural sugar. Gah!

More than ever, teachers and lunch monitors are hyper-aware of what children and students are eating but unless it’s extreme or there’s an allergy about which to be concerned, shouldn’t the main objective by schools be that the kids get fed? If a kid gets veggies or fruit (dried or fresh) or a string of cheese, is it so awful for there to be a couple of cookies or crackers or popcorn with it? More importantly, shouldn’t the parents be the ones who decides what their child should or shouldn’t eat?

We understand that no teacher wants to deal with a sugar monster, sure, but a handful of raisins? That’s where we draw the line.

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