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If you, like some of us, have been totally obsessed with Canadian ice dancing legends Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir since 2010 (or even before that), today is a good day to be a fan.

In honour of International Women’s Day (which happens to coincide with Barbie’s 60th birthday), Mattel has released new additions to their “Sheroes” line of dolls—Barbies based on real-life women who are exceptional role models for a younger generation.

If you think you’re excited, it’s probably nothing compared to how Tessa is feeling.

And Scott is doing what he does best, showing his unwavering support for his incredible ice dancing partner.

Tessa’s doll is part of Barbie’s new Dream Gap Project which is the company’s “ongoing global initiative aimed at giving girls the resources and support they need to continue believing that they can be anything.” The idea is that girls see more opportunities for themselves when they’re exposed to diverse stories of women who are like them, thus closing the “dream gap” which develops when girls believe they are limited by their gender.

So why does Tessa deserve to be a Shero Barbie? We’re so glad you asked. Tessa (along with Scott) is the most decorated figure skater in the entire history of the sport with FIVE Olympic medals (three gold, two silver) over three Olympics (Vancouver 2010, Sochi 2014 and PyeongChang 2018). She was also the youngest member of an ice dance team (at the age of 20) to ever win Olympic gold. Oh, and she’s got a book where you can read all about it.

Tessa’s Barbie joins a crew of 37 other new dolls including the likenesses of Grownish actress and activist Yara Shahidi, tennis champion Naomi Osaka, gymnastics champion Gabby Douglas, film director Ava DuVernay, model Ashley Graham, principle ballerina Misty Copeland, conservationist Bindi Irwin and pilot Amelia Earhart.

 

Barbie is calling this new lineup of role models the “the largest and most diverse” since they first began the line in 2015 with women aging from 18 (champion snowboarder Chloe Kim) to 100 years-old (NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson) and speaking 13 languages.

While you’re waiting to get a closer look at the Tessa Barbie, please enjoy her and Scott's Olympic “Roxanne” performance (because it’s been a solid week since we last looked it up).