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Appearing on a TV game show can be a stressful event. There are lights, cameras, and big money at stake. Throw in extra pressure from producers, and contestants may find themselves giving answers they would otherwise never say. That’s what happened to Evan Kaufman, who is now explaining his side of how he became ‘the guy with the racist answer’ on the $100,000 Pyramid.

Kaufman recently appeared on the game show opposite Saturday Night Live veteran Tim Meadows. When asked by host Michael Strahan to name “People whose last name in Obama,” Kaufman panicked and said “bin Laden.” Oh. No.

The writer and director went on Twitter to this week to try to explain how he inadvertently became known as the ‘racist game show guy,’ a title none of us would want. Calling the event the “most embarrassing moment of my life” and using the hashtag #KillMe, Kaufman gives a background on the now viral moment.


Citing nerves from playing with actor Tim Meadows and fatigue from having a two-week old son at home, Kaufman says that he was warned ahead of time that the answer to the final questions would be difficult. Kaufman tried to keep the show producer’s warnings in mind and expected a tricky final question.


Kaufman explains that he knows what his answer should have been, listing off members of the former first family. Shout out to Bo!


Unfortunately, he went too deep with his answer.


Kaufman notes that the viral clip doesn’t show him trying to self-correct, but instead displays some “inherent racism lurking in my brain.”


Calling the moment “the worst pyramid guess of all time,” Kaufman says that he hoped the show would edit out his answer, but understands that because the entire episode is timed it had to remain in the show.

Kaufman’s Twitter thread is a great reminder that the short clips we often see go viral online only tell a small portion of the whole story. His willingness to take ownership and apologize is also a great lesson to anyone who makes an insensitive misstep. And really, who among us hasn’t said something truly stupid? Usually, we’re just lucky enough to not have it caught on TV.


Kaufman has received support after sharing his story, including a tweet from The Roots drummer Questlove, who has also felt the pressure of impromptu answers on TV.


And if the POTUS is okay with Evan, so are we.