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A lot of Canadians are already unhappy with Canada Post’s new community mailboxes, but now they have a new reason to complain.

Up until now, the problems have mainly stemmed from the fact that the new boxes aren’t quite as close to people’s doors and homes as they used to be. But for some residents in Montreal, there’s a slightly different problem at hand.

When Peter Perron reached into his brand new community mailbox to collect his letters last week, his forearm got stuck.

Yes, stuck. As in, he couldn’t reach inside to get his mail because the opening was extremely tiny (and he’s not the only one, just check out the video above). That would suggest that Canada Post went and designed community mailboxes that are not compatible with humans, even though mailboxes only have one job: To provide people safe access to their mail.

Nice.

Before you get any ideas, Perron only weights 180 pounds–his forearms measure in at about five inches wide. The mailbox openings, by contrast, come up at about three inches wide and 18 inches long, leaving a lot of inaccessible space at the back if you can’t squeeze your forearm in.

And seriously, who has three-inch forearms, anyway?

To get around this glaring oversight, many residents have resorted to desperate measures. Some have started using BBQ tongs to reach for their mail, while others have opted to insert cardboard barriers so parcels can’t make it all the way to the back.

“But with the barrier, it restricts the amount of mail I can get,” Perron said.

That’s why he decided to reach out to Canada Post and see if the Crown corporation could do anything to fix the mistake. And here’s where things get really interesting.

According to Perron, Canada Post said they might be able to remedy the issue by installing a sliding tray. Simple enough, right? But before that can happen, they need to investigate.

“Whoever’s investigating, he thinks it’s required–I have to go see a doctor, have a form filled in stating about the dimensions of my arm and then they can still refuse,” Perron said.

So Perron is essentially being asked to prove that his arm is indeed the size of a “normal” human one, and even then they can decline his request.

Wow.

For their part, Canada Post representative Anick Losier called the situation an “isolated incident,” and referred to the corporations “Accommodation Program” that is supposed to resolve cases like these.

Either way, come winter, everyone’s gloved-hands are going to require some serious accommodation.