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Try this on for size, New York Times.

The world-renowned newspaper recently penned a wide-ranging article about Halifax-born movie star Ellen Page. But tucked within the lines of text was a bombshell of “information” about the East Coast city:

“Page was born and raised in Halifax, Nova Scotia, about as far as you can get (geographically, historically and spiritually) from Hollywood. The city’s downtown wraps around a central hill; its North End was largely destroyed by a freak explosion nearly 100 years ago. The harbor [sic] is occasionally punctuated by breaching whales. A few years after Page was born, in 1987, Nova Scotia’s fishing industry hit a hard spell. The region still has one of the highest unemployment rates in Canada.”

Yeah, right…Halifax never fixed the damage left from its infamous explosion ONE-HUNDRED YEARS AGO. The whole North End is still just a pile of rubble. Got it… And what’s this nonsense about Halifax being “spiritually” far from Hollywood? Because we’re less—er, plastic?

It’s like the author just searched “Halifax” on Google and inserted the first few “facts” they found to underscore Page’s story.

Well, you know what, NYT? Two can play at that game. Upon discovering the article, Huddle, a Maritime news site that champions East Coast entrepreneurship, unleashed their own tirade of “information” against the massive American city:

“Donald Trump was born in New York City, about as far as you can get (environmentally, culturally and socially) from Halifax, Nova Scotia. The borough of Manhattan is surrounded by water, making its residents likely to perish horribly in a flood. In 1980, 1,814 people were murdered on its blood-soaked streets. New York’s crushing mass of humanity is punctuated by more than 2 million rats, which are known to steal pizza and carry the plague. Alligators are thought to roam its sewers. In 1897 the city’s wooden barrel making industry hit a hard spell. Even today, New York City has unemployed people.”

We also hear the city had a pretty big gang problem in the late 1800s. We’ll just go ahead and assume they never fixed that either.

Don’t mess with us, New York.