Style Decor
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • +
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email
SHARE THIS
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email

Some people wait for the end of Halloween, or Black Friday, or the first snowfall to officially begin celebrating Christmas. We wait for the decorations at Buckingham Palace. The Palace staff has been busy decorating for the upcoming holiday season and as usual, the Queen’s Christmas display has enough joy and merriment to make even the Grinchiest of hearts grow three sizes.

As per the royal tradition first started by Queen Charlotte, the consort of George III, the Royal Family primarily uses Christmas trees in their decorating plans. Trees used to decorate Windsor Castle and Buckingham Palace are grown at Windsor Great Park, with Windsor Castle decorated at the end of November and Buckingham Palace receiving its final touches this week. A 23ft tall Nordmann Fir stands in the Palace’s St George’s Hall, with a 15ft tree bringing Christmas cheer to the Crimson Drawing Room.

The many trees are delivered to the Palace at the beginning of December, with a team of staff securing the trees in large wooden holders. The trees are then decorated in ‘royal style,’ which means decorations feature the Royal Family crest in the shapes of crowns and carriages, as well as balls and ribbons. A garland adorned with brightly coloured Christmas balls is also installed in the Marble Hall, with all decorations keeping to a strict traditional look.

This year’s stunning Christmas display can be seen in a video posted on the Royal Family’s social media pages, which shows just how serious the Queen is about Christmas.

Amazingly, there is still more decorating to do. The Queen traditionally waits until Christmas eve to trim her tree at Sandringham House in Norfolk. After celebrating Christmas with her immediate family during a pre-Christmas lunch at Buckingham Palace in December, the Queen and Prince Philip will travel to Sandringham House, where they will stay until February. While it’s common to remove Christmas decorations by the Twelfth Night, which can be January 5 or 6, the Queen keeps her decorations in Sandringham House up until February 6, the anniversary of her father’s death, after which she’ll return to the Palace.

Not only do the royals fill their own homes with trees, as per tradition, they also donate trees to Westminster Abbey, St. Paul’s Cathedral, St. Giles’ Cathedral, the Canongate Kirk in Edinburgh, and the surrounding churches and schools in the Sandringham area.

And if the Queen’s insistence on sticking to traditional décor seems too rigid, just remember what happens when people try to get creative with Christmas.