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Is it possible for a man to be wrongly convicted twice in his lifetime? Well, yes, of course. Did it happen this time? Maybe. Steven Avery, the Wisconsin man featured on the series Making a Murderer is getting another day in court, now that a judge has ordered new testing on evidence — including Avery’s blood sample — that put him away in 2007 for the murder of photographer Teresa Halbach.

Talk about something to give thanks for this U.S. Thanksgiving.

Avery’s latest lawyer, Kathleen Zellner, revealed that an agreement to reexamine the evidence has been officially signed, but wasn’t able to tell media exactly when the results would be in. She simply expressed gratitude that the Attorney General’s office had been helpful in “expediting these tests.”

It just goes to show you the power of television. This announcement comes just shy of a year since Making A Murderer‘s December 2015 debut. Thanks to social media wildfire the show’s popularity positively spiked within its first month online, with tons of fan theories, Reddit pages and heated discussions surfacing everywhere.

Between Steven Avery and The Jinx‘s Robert Durst, it seems like true crime stories are pretty much here to stay, huh?

Since Murderer came out there have been a few changes in the case to note. Avery, who was out of funds to battle this thing, managed to secure Zellner as his new legal representative and she has promised to reveal who Teresa’s real murderer is. Meanwhile, Steven’s nephew Brendan Dassey — who was also convicted in the murder — had his conviction overturned in August. (Unfortunately for him he’s still in prison while prosecutors appeal that decision.)

As fans of the series already know, an overturned conviction for Steven Avery wouldn’t be his first. The man previously served 18 years for a rape conviction he was later cleared of when new DNA evidence surfaced. His ongoing tumultuous relationship with the local police provided much fodder for the series, as it raised questions of conspiracy and collusion.

So… did Avery actually do it? The jury may once again be out, but it looks like we could be a little bit closer to some actual answers on the other side of the new year.