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America is facing an urgent crisis this Halloween: There is a shortage of pumpkins.

Repeat: There is a shortage of pumpkins leading up to Halloween.

The country is desperately trying to ramp up its harvest after anywhere between 50 and 60 per cent of the Midwest-region’s crops were wiped out by record rains. Even Libby’s, a canned pumpkin manufacturer, warned of shortages in its pie filling since the company’s harvest will barely last to next month’s American thanksgiving (November never made sense for Thanksgiving anyway, but we digress). As a result, residents have been left in a state of utter uncertainty.

How will the U.S. carve any Jack-O-Lanterns? Where will its people acquire the fruit’s precious seeds?

WHEN will baristas be able to brew their Pumpkin Spice Lattes again?!

Enter Canada, Halloween hero. Fortunately, we aren’t having any problems with our pumpkin harvest this year. Which is why we’ve been sending hundreds of thousands of pumpkins south or the border recently, in a desperate bid to save the country’s October tradition.

In one U.S. farm, Canada was able to supply 25 per cent of its total deficit.

“[The shortage] has caused everybody to scramble and look to get them wherever they can,” Darrell Theis, co-owner of Theis Farms in Missouri, told the CBC. “I wouldn’t be surprised that there will be some loads coming in from Ontario, maybe a little bit from Quebec.”

The stronger U.S. dollar has also helped lure some farmers to look north to cover off their pumpkin supply, but Theis says this isn’t his first time Canada has stepped in to help.

“We’re all in it together (and) every once in awhile we have to help each other out,” he told the public broadcaster.

We’ll just assume that’s his way of saying “Thank you, Canada”.