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If you’ve been sitting around wondering what we’re going to do when the world ends in 12 years because of climate change, the United Nations might have an answer. Rather than be totally displaced as the tides rise and increasingly worse storms slam our structures to oblivion, we could take to the seas in our own inflatable cities.

Stop laughing, this is serious.

The U.N. just unveiled plans developed by Danish architect Bjarke Ingels with Oceanix (a builder of floating structures) for a giant hexagonal floating city that could house up to 10,000 residents. The city is designed to withstand water-based natural disasters such as tsunamis, floods and category 5 hurricanes and will be impervious to the inevitable rising tides.

While “floating city” sounds pretty far fetched and has been laughed at in the past, this particular concept is actually supported by the experts at the U.N. According to Business Insider India, Maimunah Mohd Sharif, director of the United Nations Human Settlement Programme, says the international organization would help make it a reality.

“Everybody on the team actually wants to get this built,” Oceanix CEO Marc Collins said. “We’re not just theorizing.”

These little utopias will also be fully focused on being green and sustainable. BI reports that an aquifer system will extract clean water from the air, high-emitting vehicles will be banned and each city will have an accompanying “ocean farming” system which will allow the cultivation of crops under water.

And if you’re worried about your whole city just floating around the great blue sea, that won’t be a problem. While the project is billed as a “floating city,” the whole structure will actually be secured to the ocean floor for stability.

So where do we sign for our very own floating weatherproof condo?

The idea is gaining traction fast, and even Lin-Manuel Miranda is on board. After the devastation in his home of Puerto Rico by Hurricane Maria in 2017, Miranda has a deep understanding of the impacts of climate change on coastal regions.

Plus, he’d really like to take on author Maureen Johnson in a game of Settlers of Catan.

Please let this plan be more than a concept design for Meet the Robinsons 2!