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You know the red cups we’re talking about. The ones from keggers, bush parties, frat and sorority houses, barbecues and maybe even parent-free high school shindigs. Hey, we’re not judging where you know them from. Just know this: You are most likely completely unaware of the cups’ coolest feature.

Made by the Solo Cup Company, its official name is the Party Cup (though the many knock-offs have similar names). In the 1970s, it was originally created in four colours, but the red 18-ounce one quickly rose above its counterparts to become the party cup of choice.

So what’s this secret feature we’re going on about? Chances are you don’t have one of the cups in your hand right now (bravo, if you do), so do your best to try to recollect the lines that run around the diameter of the cup. Sure, they’re great for grip and all, but we think they represent something more significant: measurements.

The lines conveniently mark specific amounts in ounces. Starting from the bottom up, they mark one ounce (a perfect shot of bourbon), five ounces (a standard wine glass amount), 12 ounces (a typical can of soda or beer), 16 ounces (a pint), and the final 18-ounce mark for any ice overflow.

Dart Container Corporation (Solo’s owner), naturally, denies that the lines on their cups are there to measure alcohol. We get it — they can’t endorse excessive alcohol consumption. These are cups at kids’ picnics, people!

The Solo Cup Company
In any case, it doesn’t really matter what Dart says, since the company no longer creates the circle-bottom cups. They’ve gone square, literally. So the only way you can enjoy the beautiful lines and (potential) alcohol measurements is with the knock-off brands, which are thankfully still stuck in the ’70s.

Cheers! In a responsible way, of course.

 

And now that you know the secret, here are some other fun things you can do with them:

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