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You’re just waiting on a text from your S.O. to find out what to pick up at the grocery store. You only want to skip to the next song because the current one isn’t quite doing it for you. You just need to check Google maps to make sure you didn’t pass your exit. It’s easy to justify using your phone while driving. It’s there to make your life easier, right? Sure, but this new advertisement from AT&T for their #ItCanWait campaign shows the real dangers of even glancing at your phone when the road should have your full attention.

Jacy Good and her family were in a car crash caused by a distracted driver on their way home from Jacy’s college graduation in 2008. A teenager was talking on the phone while driving and turned left on a red light, causing a tractor trailer to swerve and hit the Good’s station wagon. Both her parents were killed and Jacy herself was left partially paralyzed after months of treatment and rehabilitation. She and her husband have spoken out against distracted driving ever since.

In the ad, a group of young adults admit to using their phones while driving and then make excuses for their actions. The first minute is just a long list of no-nos in the car. One boy even says, ‘the passenger has a pretty important job now, like, ‘oh, red light, red light.” We find that a little (read: a lot) concerning. These people seem pretty okay with their distracted driving habits, that is, until they meet the living, breathing lesson. How can anyone justify using their phone in the car after meeting Jacy Good?

It might be a little dark, but maybe that’s what we need to realize just how bad glancing at our phones can be. One little mistake can cause a lifetime of pain for someone. Or the end of a life. It’s hear-warming to see that this kind of campaign works though. The group in the video is moved by Jacy’s story and vows to leave their phones alone while driving. Distracted driving is a factor in 80 percent of collisions which means reducing accidents is within our reach. Distractions aren’t always avoidable, but they usually are. Let’s stop texting and driving. It can wait.