Health
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • +
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email
SHARE THIS
  • Facebook
    Facebook
  • Twitter
    Twitter
  • Pinterest
    Pinterest
  • Linkedin
    Linkedin
  • WhatsApp
    WhatsApp
  • Email
    Email

Millions of people die each year from water-borne diseases, but a groundbreaking invention from engineers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and the University of Virginia may have changed all that.

The Drinkable Book delivers exactly what it promises: Developed by chemist Dr. Theresa Dankovich, it’s made of pages treated with silver nano particles, which kill diseases like cholera, e.coli and typhoid. Amazing, right? But what’s even better is its simplicity.

Tear off a page, slide it into the custom filter box and then pour contaminated water through it. That’s it. The result is water safe enough to drink. Just how safe? The filter removes 99.9 per cent of bacteria from the water, making it like the North American stuff we gulp down every day.

Where does the whole “book” concept come in? Each page features tips and information to educate people about safe water habits. Oh, and the scientists use food-grade ink (biodegradable, natch), so basically this is the best news you’ll read all day.

But that’s not all: The Drinkable Book costs pennies to produce and is extremely sustainable. Each filter is capable of giving someone up to 30 days of clean water, and each book can provide someone with filtered, drinkable water for up to four years. Forget today: This will be the best news you’ll read all year.

Want to help distribute these amazing books to people in need? You can contribute here.

See the book in action in the video, above.