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Not all droughts are created equal; while many may lead to famine and unspeakable horrors, others can reveal hidden secrets. This is one of the latter cases, thank goodness.

The Temple of Santiago (also known as the Temple of Quechula) in Chiapas, Mexico, was abandoned hundreds of years ago, submerged 100 feet below water after a dam completed in 1966 created the Nezahualcoyotl reservoir. But thanks to a drought that caused water levels to drop significantly, the temple is now visible.

The mid-16th century church was built in 1564 by a group of monks. Locals expected the population in the surrounding area would flourish, reports the Daily Mail.

AP

“It was a church built thinking that this could be a great population centre, but it never achieved that,” said architect Carlos Navarretes. “It probably never even had a dedicated priest, only receiving visits from those from Tecpatan.” A plague devasted the area and, as a result, the temple was abandoned in 1773.

AP

Almost half a century later, in 2002, the water levels came down to the point that people were able to walk into the church. Waters rose, but now, local fishermen are taking tourists and curious visitors in boats to see the remains of the magnificent temple.

 

We’re just happy we could catch a glimpse of this wonder before the water levels rise again!