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We’ve met lots of different racers over the course of The Amazing Race Canada. We’ve seen siblings, besties, parents and kids, partners, teammates… but never before have we seen a grandfather and grandson team up to tackle this thing. Until now, that is.

Gilles and Sean Miron decided to audition for the race when Sean’s mother basically told them they should do it to coincide with Gilles’ birthday. So they did, and now the Sunderland, Ont. natives are ready to share their unique relationship with the rest of Canada.

“When Sean was young we called him The Old Soul because he was always concerned about other people,” Gilles says. “He grew up in a house full of adults, so he was always a bit more mature than what he seemed like.”

A second chance at fatherhood

In terms of second chances (this year’s theme), Gilles has one of the most personal. His daughter was 16 and dealing with mental illness when she had Sean, which forced Gilles to take up the father mantle for a second time in his life. This time he was determined to do it differently.

“He quit all alcohol and smokes and drugs cold-turkey because he thought he needed to be a better him, and in doing that he could show me a better way of living,” Sean says. “Because of that I haven’t ever touched any alcohol or drugs or anything. He led by example.”

Gilles may have quit his vices overnight, but he replaced them with something much healthier: meditation. For seven years straight he says he sat down with his thoughts once a day, and asked himself all of the hard questions.

“It changed my life,” he says. “Overnight I changed into another person and I have this young man to thank for that.”

Bringing the small-town vibe

On the race itself, the Mirons are concerned about language barriers if they have to travel outside of Canada, but beyond that they believe their farming experience and small-town upbringing could give them an advantage and even help them complete some of the tougher tasks that “city” racers might stumble over.

“We’re very outdoorsy, we live with a little bit of isolation,” Sean says. “I’ve worked with my hands, so I’m not in this material world. We think this small-town experience will give us that edge and that grit that the other teams might not have.”

That grit will be put to the test when The Amazing Race Canada debuts on Tuesday, July 2 at 9 p.m. ET on CTV.