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If you’ve spent any time in a maternity ward, you know it can be a chaotic place.

Nurses and doctors and lactation consultants rush in and out, checking this, that and the other. Announcements blare from the intercom every few minutes. Your in-laws drop by unexpectedly for a “quick” visit. Meanwhile, you’re desperately trying to get to know this teeny-tiny person you’re suddenly responsible for.

But you know what would make those first moments a whole lot easier? A little peace and quiet.

Thankfully, that’s exactly what one maternity ward has done in Quebec. St. Mary’s Hospital recently introduced “quiet time,” a daily, one-hour period where the ward’s lights are dimmed, that awful intercom is turned off, and visitors are encouraged to leave. Doctors and nurses won’t even bother moms during this time, unless there’s an emergency.

In other words, mom and baby will finally have some private, much-needed bonding time.

“These moments of rest [are] very important to decrease anxiety and stress level,” maternity-and-youth-program assistant director Marie-France Brizard told CTV News.

The idea was actually born out of research conducted by McGill University, which found “Noise and interruptions can greatly affect the health and safety of the patients admitted to hospitals, specifically on maternity wards. There is evidence to demonstrate that high levels of disruption negatively impact the healing process for new mothers and their newborns.”

The research proposed a simple solution: quiet time.

So far, the hospital’s new initiative has been a success.

“No one interrupts you, no one comes to ask you for any questions, no temperature, no pressure or no test with the baby is just great,” said Carla Odige, a new mother staying at the hospital. “You’re here and you just look at your baby and you’re like ‘I did this, this is mine, this is amazing.'”

It certainly is. Check out the video above for more details.