Life Food
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Move over brown paper tablecloths and crayon nubs, because we’ve found a brand new way to occupy ourselves as we wait for our dinner and it kind of blows your doodles off the table.

A new viral video from Skullmapping shows just how much fun actually waiting for your meal can be with just a little creativity (and some projection art). In the video, above, patrons wait for their steak, potatoes and veggies while watching a cartoon of a little chef actually preparing it for them. He pops out of the table at each diner’s place setting and gets to work grilling the meat, all while chopping down broccoli the size of trees.

It’s sort of like what going to teppanyaki is like, only you don’t have to catch food with your mouth, watch a smoking onion volcano or eat with other people you don’t know. The best part is that it’s all virtual, so there’s no mess to clean up afterwards either.

Then, once the video is done playing and the little chefs disappear back down their holes, real waiters come with plates of food that are pretty similar to what you just watched being cooked. By that point, you’ve had no time to think about how hungry you actually are, and now you have an instant conversation starter at the table too – double win.

Sadly, it looks like we could be a long way off from actually having this kind of technology at our local Moxie’s or Jack Astor’s – let alone the fancy new hotspot in your hometown. Still, it’s something to strive towards for eateries everywhere. In the meantime, just bring it up as a dinner topic in the near future the next time you’re dining out, and hopefully by the time your group is done marveling at the coolness of such a prospect, your dinner will be there anyhow.

No crayons necessary.