Life Parenting
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There are studies, and then there are some obvious facts. And then there is that unique combination of both, in which people are paid to research something we all know to be true, with a whole bunch of “Thanks, Captain Obvious” in between.

This is one of those studies. And it’s Canadian, to boot.

According to some researchers at the University of British Columbia, the University of Toronto and Dalhousie University, roughly 80 per cent of new parents experienced concerns about their sex life following the birth of a baby. These concerns included everything from the drop in how often a couple was having sex to physical recovery, sleep deprivation and body image.

Although the actual study won’t be published until June, early hints indicate that men are more dissatisfied than women when it comes to their time in between the sheets. No, reallly?!?!?!? Perhaps these women just had more on their minds between healing and breastfeeding?

Additionally, in a more interesting move we can get behind, the study is looking at women’s sexual enjoyment post-birth and whether the pain goes away during intercourse. Most of us know that there’s a doctor-recommended, six-week period in which new parents should wait to have sex after birth, but beyond that it seems as though the long-term pain can linger for some.

According to the sneak peek, about a third of women studied found they were pain-free at three months postpartum, while for another third there was really no change. For that last third, however, the ones experiencing vulvodynia (a chronic pain that comes with itching or irritation), the pain only worsened.

Sadly, other than the abstinence stance, it also seems like most doctors don’t take the time to discuss vaginal recovery or pain with their patients at any of the follow-up visits, making this study an important one after all — especially in terms of raising awareness on the subject.

As for the idea that new parents have more intimacy issues? Well between sleepless nights, leaking boobs, and a kid that requires constant attention, we’re not sure what else would actually be expected. Getting 15 minutes for a shower becomes a Game of Thrones-like situation, let alone finding 15 minutes of dipstick time.

We’re just saying.

 

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