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Our face is the one thing we’re all forced to wear every single day, so it’s no wonder that there are myriad beauty products, facial regimens and cosmetic procedures dedicated to maintaining its glow and youth. Plus sometimes it just feels nice to actually take care of the skin you’re in.

But while we’ve become accustomed to exfoliators, clay masks and DIY concoctions of oatmeal, coconut oil and yogurt to slough off dead skin and firm up those fine lines, there’s a new game-changing procedure out there that’s bound to revolutionize everything.

Introducing MAPO, a digital face mask from Wired Beauty that’s been three years in the making and kind of looks like the same mask worn by The Phantom of the Opera. The product will be unveiled at the CES Las Vegas Beauty Tech Summit next month, and comes with an app called La Clinique Digitale. ‘Cause you know, French-sounding products always come across as more luxe.

Basically the silicone mask uses a 3D imaging technique complete with digital sensors to record information about your skin, your physiology and the environment you’re exposed to every day. It pretty much monitors everything from the skin’s moisture level to firmness and sends it your smart phone. Then, it generates customized product recommendations to fix any problems it has detected (sans any sponsorships or brand loyalty), taking the guesswork out of visits to the overcrowded skincare counter.

Sadly, no word on how much the mask will cost us just yet, as its official Kickstarter campaign has yet to commence.

Still, it sounds like a dream come true to us. Well, except the fact that other than take measurements the mask itself doesn’t actually fix any problems – it only makes educated recommendations. So our days of clay masks might not be completely behind us after all. But at least with MAPO we’ll be buying the right ones.