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It’s almost that time of year again, when women can choose to embrace Halloween as an opportunity to dress provocatively. If you want to be a sexy cat, or sexy police officer, or sexy zombie, more power to you. Enjoy. But what about the kids?

Girls’ Halloween costumes have progressively gotten sexier and some parents are none too pleased. One mother, Lin Kramer, is trying to do something about it.

After perusing Party City’s website to hunt down a costume for her three-year-old daughter, Kramer was disappointed by what she found. The career-related offerings in the “Toddler Costumes” section were not what she expected, with empowering costumes being marketed to the boys while the girls were left with cutesy, sexy choices that looked like miniature versions of the women’s aisle. Of Victoria’s Secret.

Kramer attempted to reach out to Party City on Facebook but after numerous attempts (and deletions), she figured an open letter to the company would have to do.

An open letter to #PartyCity:Dear Party City, Having just finished perusing your website for Halloween costumes for…
Posted by Lin Kramer on Monday, 14 September 2015

What more can we say? Kramer did have concerns with how scantily clad Party City’s interpretation of a female police officer is but that wasn’t her only issue. The descriptors used for boys’ costume versus girls’ were absolutely ridiculous. Maybe girls don’t want to be and “sassy” and “sweet,” perhaps they’d like to, “have it all under control” like the boys do.

Yes, there are many girls out there who want to dress up like a beautiful princess or an adorable witch or precious pirate, but there are also those who want to dress like their parents or a mentor; perhaps a doctor or a construction worker or a soldier. But if your kid doesn’t feel comfortable wearing clothes made for the opposite sex, well tough.

Hopefully Party City does open up their minds, like Kramer hopes, and stops pushing their “antiquated views of gender roles” soon. Because enough is enough.