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Celeb feuds are weird and often totally unprecedented (in the past two days alone we’ve seen Justin Bieber vs. Tom Cruise and Audra McDonald vs. Laura Linney). Now we’ve got Kiefer Sutherland (yes, Jack Bauer himself) vs. Doug Ford, which seems totally random but actually makes a lot of sense with a quick Canadian history lesson.

Kiefer issued a statement on Twitter Monday calling out Conservative Ontario MPP Lisa MacLeod for an op-ed she wrote comparing Ontario premier Doug Ford to Tommy Douglas—the late NDP premiere of Saskatchewan, father of modern Canadian healthcare and Kiefer Sutherland’s maternal grandfather. In the piece, she asserted that Douglas—who was famously the leader of a socialist government—would have agreed with the current Ontario government’s cuts to public services in order to balance the budget and prevent deficit spending.

His grandson, Kiefer, would apparently beg to differ. He responded to the piece in an open letter to Doug Ford disputing MacLeod’s assumptions, calling them “offensive” and imploring her to “stop posting [Douglas’] picture and using his name as part of your political agenda.”

He ended the letter with a savage, “I knew Tommy Douglas and you sir, are no Tommy Douglas. P.S. You’re lucky my mum’s not active on Twitter.”

MacLeod didn’t take well to the statement and shot back at Sutherland with a reference to his TV show Designated Survivor where he plays the president of the United States.

Doug Ford hasn’t publicly responded to Sutherland’s letter.

Although he wasn’t perfect (he was a great supporter of eugenics before his election), Canadians have Tommy Douglas to thank for the “free” healthcare Canadians enjoy today. He was premier from 1944 to 1961 and in 1948 established the Saskatchewan Hospital Services Plan which was the first government-funded health insurance in Canada and prompted the federal government to create a similar plan for the whole country.