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From Hollywood to government to business, the Me Too movement is upsetting the hold of powerful men everywhere. There’s one man it can’t seem to touch though and that’s the president of the United States (you know, the guy who sits in the Oval Office and isn’t supposed to be above the law?). Despite accusations from 20 women of varying degrees of sexual misconduct and his recorded admission that he has forced himself on women, Donald Trump was elected to the highest office in the U.S. and firmly remains there. Now his accusers are speaking up again to hopefully change that.

Like so many women, Trump’s accusers saw the Me Too movement and the serious implications that it was having for powerful men and were emboldened by it. These women came forward before this current reckoning and were dismissed as liars by the Trump campaign immediately. In summer 2016, women were quickly forgotten after their claims of sexual misconduct were denied. In fall 2017, victims don’t go away so easy.

On Monday, three of Trump’s accusers — Samantha Holvey, Rachel Crooks and Jessica Leeds — held a press conference in which they told their stories and called for congress to investigate the allegations against Trump. Holvey was a Miss Universe contestant while Trump owned the pageant and described how he would enter their change rooms to survey the women — an act he admitted to to Howard Stern in 2005. Rachel Crooks described an incident that occurred when she was a receptionist for a company inside Trump Tower. She introduced herself to Donald Trump by the elevators one day and he kissed her repeatedly on the cheeks and lips. Jessica Leeds was seated next to Trump on a flight and when he “got bored,” he reached up her skirt. The women were joined by others for an appearance on Megyn Kelly Today to tell their stories again and explain why they aren’t going away.

The White House response has been the same this time around as it was the last time: Trump denies these claims and is annoyed that people keep bringing them up. The administration issued a written statement, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said that the American people made their position on the issue known when they elected Trump and the White House sent a statement to Megyn Kelly Today disputing the women’s stories.

Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, was the only government official to speak out in defense of women. When asked on Face the Nation what she thought of the accusers of the president, she responded that “women who accuse anyone should be heard.” Naturally, the next day, sources close to the president reported that he was angry at Haley’s comments and felt that she had “stuck a knife in his back.”

The legal action that these accusers can take is limited. All they can really do is call for an ethics investigation into the alleged misconduct. Four senators have also called for Trump’s resignation over these claims, but again, they do not possess any real power over the president. While we would all like to think that congress will do the right thing and officially investigate the president for sexual misconduct, it’s very unlikely.