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If room temperature water isn’t quenching your thirst, you’re not alone. A new study by the Monell Chemical Senses Center proves that cold, carbonated beverages quench our thirst better than room temperature, non-carbonated drinks.

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The study followed just under 100 people and asked them to abstain from drinking and eating overnight. When the 98 healthy participants, aged 20-50, visited the lab in the morning, they were given toast for breakfast and mostly rated their thirst as ‘strong.’

The participants were then given five minutes to drink 13 and a half ounces of cold water or room temperature water. Both the cold and room temperature water were given either carbonated or non-carbonated.

The results found that cold water reduced thirst better than room temperature water, with cold carbonated water as the best thirst-quencher.

The study aimed to find the ideal drink to increase the amount of fluid a person drinks, hoping to promote hydration. More specifically, the study’s author wanted to “guide sensory approaches to increase fluid intake in populations at risk for dehydration, including the elderly, soldiers, and athletes.”

There are two important things to note with this study. First, it was funded by the Japanese beer company Suntory, so while the Monell Chemical Senses Centre maintains that the study was done independently and without influence, we do want to be transparent.

Second, while carbonated drinks are better at quenching thirst, they are not better at hydrating. Keep that in mind next time you reach for a pop before heading out on a 5-km run. Instead, have a glass of cold and bubbly carbonated water waiting for you at the finish line.

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